Tag Archive | Post-Civil War

“My Heart Belongs in Ruby City, Idaho” by Susanne Dietze

“My Heart Belongs in Ruby City, Idaho” by Susanne Dietze is a delightful novel about mail-order brides.  Think what would happen if you married the wrong man mistakenly.  After almost starving and with no place to live, Rebecca answers an ad in a magazine, receives a reply from Theodore, a mercantile owner in Ruby City.  As soon as she steps off the stage a man runs to her, claims her as his intended and they get married right away.  However when she said “I do” to “Tad”, she thought she was saying “I do” to Ted, Tad’s cousin and then the fun begins.  This scenario may seem a bit contrived to some, but the further escapades of Rebecca and the townspeople provide a fun and enjoyable story.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.

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“A Most Inconvenient Marriage” by Regina Jennings

I loved this book!   “A Most Inconvenient Marriage” by Regina Jennings was a joy to read.  It had all the elements of a page-turner.

Right away, I was hooked because the writing was so very readable.  Abigail Stuart is a nurse working at a prison hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, in early 1865.  One of her patients, Captain Jeremiah Calhoun, a Confederate prisoner, is dying and asks her to marry him in order for her to have his farm in the Ozarks and to have her care for his ailing sister and mother after his death.  Since Abby is estranged from her family and has no one to go home to, she agrees.

After the war is over, upon her arrival at the farm, she is immediately welcomed by Jeremiah’s mother and tolerated by his ailing sister.  She pitches in and becomes an invaluable asset to the farm and family.  She is known to all in the area as Captain Calhoun’s widow.  This is all fine until Captain Jeremiah Calhoun returns to his farm and demands to know why and how Abigail thinks she is going to steal his farm.  It is a most inconvenient marriage for both of them.  Just who was the soldier she married?  Why would this man pretend to be Captain Calhoun?  Where does this leave Abigail?

I really enjoyed reading this book and finding out where all this was headed.  Not only was this storyline enjoyable, but there were also jayhawkers, horse thieves, and worse making life difficult during this time.  The characters in this story were very believable and convincing.  I really wanted everything to work out for all.  I would like to read more books by Ms. Jennings.

I was sent a free print copy of this book by Bethany House in return for my honest assessment of the book.

“Love’s Sweet Beginning” by Ann Shorey

I read “Love’s Sweet Beginning” by Ann Shorey, for the Revell Reads program.  I was sent a free print copy of this book for my review.  The thoughts about this novel are my own.

I enjoyed this book very much.  It was interesting because of the fact in prominently wealthy households women were treated as pretty things to be coddled and waited upon by servants.  The mothers were treated as such and consequently the daughters of the house were raised to party and look pretty in order to snare a husband.  In turn, that family would continue the tradition.  Some women never washed a dish, or did laundry, or cleaned, or looked after a garden, or “put up” produce.  When the time came that this practice could no longer be sustained as happened after the Civil War in the south, women could not provide for themselves.  This is the story of a mother and daughter caught in this predicament.  How the daughter managed to provide for herself and her mother is the gist of this story.  It was very enlightening, and even though it is a work of fiction, I’m sure this was the lot of many women in the south.

“Prairie Song” by Mona Hodgson

Prairie Song, written by Mona Hodgson, is Book 1 of the Heart Seeking Home Series. It is the story of the Boone’s Lick Company Wagon Train, which left from St. Charles, Missouri, to travel west with new settlers shortly after the Civil War.

In particular, it is the story of Anna Goben, her mother and grandfather; and of Caroline Milburn, a young widow whose husband died in the war. Anna’s mother is an alcoholic and Anna thinks it would be good for her to have new adventures. Her father left when she was small and her brother was killed in the Civil War. Alcohol is her mother’s way of coping.

Caroline Milburn has been living with her sister, her husband and children. Space is too tight for that many family members and her brother-in-law came back from the war an invalid with a mean outlook on life. Caroline is going west to change her life and find a way to support herself.

This is a very interesting outlook on life after the war. So many families and individuals decided to head west to the open lands to try to make a new live for themselves and their families. The adventures start as soon as the wagon train pulls out of St. Charles.

I know you will enjoy this book. It is a book of faith and perseverance, which will make you think about the good in your life as you read about the hardships of theirs.

Night Owl Reviews and Waterbrook Press sent a print advance reading copy in return for my honest review.

, written by Mona Hodgson, is Book 1 of Heart Seeking Home Series.  It is the story of the Boone’s Lick Company Wagon Train, which left from St. Charles, Missouri, to travel west with new settlers shortly after the Civil War.

In particular, it is the story of Anna Goben, her mother and grandfather; and of Caroline Milburn, a young widow whose husband died in the war.  Anna’s mother is an alcoholic and Anna thinks it would be good for her to have new adventures.  Her father left when she was small and her brother was killed in the Civil War.  Alcohol is her mother’s way of coping.

Caroline Milburn has been living with her sister, her husband and children.  Space is too tight for that many family members and her brother-in-law came back from the war an invalid with a mean outlook on life.  Caroline is going west to change her life and find a way to support herself.

This is a very interesting outlook on life after the war.  So many families and individuals decided to head west to the open lands to try to make a new live for themselves and their families.  The adventures start as soon as the wagon train pulls out of St. Charles.

I know you will enjoy this book.  It is a book of faith and perseverance, which will make you think about the good in your life as you read about the hardships of theirs.

Night Owl Reviews and Waterbrook Press sent a print advance reading copy in return for my honest review.

“Dandelions of the Wind” by Mona Hodgson

I read “Dandelions of the Wind”, a novella which is the first book of The Quilted Heart series, by Mona Hodgson.

I really liked this story of a post-civil War Missouri family.  The story is mainly about Maren, an immigrant mail-order-bride from Denmark who comes to the United States to marry.  Because she is gradually losing her eyesight, the groom refuses to marry her.  She is offered shelter in the form of room and board in return for working on the farm and caring for the granddaughter of Mrs. Brantenberg.

The girl’s father, Rutherford (Wooley) returns after a four-year absence, during which he fought in the Civil War and in the west against the Native Americans.  He left the farm after the death of his wife, Mrs. Brantenberg’s daughter, in childbirth.  He has come home to make amends and to be with his daughter again.  He doesn’t count on meeting the lovely Maren.

This is a very sweet story and I wish it had been longer.  I hope the subsequent stories in this series pick up where this one left off.  I would very much like to find out what happens next.

I was sent this free Kindle book from the publisher, Waterbrook Multnomah, and their blog, Bloggingforbooks.com for my honest review.

“Reconstructing Jackson” by Holly Bush

“Reconstructing Jackson” by Holly Bush was a great historical fiction novel.  The story gave an excellent portrayal of life in post-Civil War Missouri.  Reed Jackson is a lawyer who fought for the south in the war and subsequently was wheel-chair bound.  He came west to Missouri to his cousin’s hotel at his mother’s insistence to start life anew.  He understandably was bitter because of his injuries that made him feel less than a whole man, but those he met along the way showed him that in spite of his limitations, he was capable of living a wonderfully full life.

This time in history was very dangerous because even though the war was over, the sentiments of those on both sides of the issue ran very high.  The fact that slaves had been set free by President Lincoln did not set well with some of the inhabitants of Fenton, Missouri.  Belle Richards was a dirt poor farm girl who was abused by her father and brothers, but who had a dream for her future.  Miss Beulah ran the Ames Hotel for Henry and Mary Ellen, Reed’s cousin and his wife.  Beulah was an ex-slave who was secretly teaching other ex-slaves and Belle to read.  When Belle’s father and brothers found out that she had learned to read and write, they beat her savagely.  Belle came to Beulah for help to get away from her family.  Reed married Belle to get her away from danger.

When it all came out about the reading and writing lessons, certain folks in Fenton decided to take it out on those freemen and their church members.  During this time, Reed came to understand that his attitude about slavery and the south was not what he truly believed anymore.  Belle helped him see what good he could accomplish and how he could overcome his injuries.

This is a really good book about how life’s experiences can overcome one’s attitude and outlook on life.

I received a free print copy of this book in return for my honest review.