“Catching the Wind” by Melanie Dobson

“Catching the Wind” by Melanie Dobson is a very fascinating novel.  Dietmar Roth and Brigitte Berthold were childhood friends back in Germany in 1940.  Dietmar was three years older than Brigitte at the age of 13.  Of course Germany was under Nazi rule at this time and everyone was tense and scared.  One afternoon, the children were together playing when they heard screams and ran home.  Just in time they hid as they saw the Gestapo taking away their parents.  Dietmar ran to the window in his home and saw his mother mouth the words “RUN!”.  He grabbed Brigitte and they ran for all they were worth, finally making their way to Belgium.  Although Belgium was also under German rule, they were able to escape to England where they were parted and sent to various locations.  They were thought to be British children and were being evacuated to escape the Blitz.  They were never reunited.

Seventy years later, Quenby Vaughn is doing an article on English aristocratic families who collaborated with the Germans during the war.  Some provided safe houses for German soldiers who were infiltrating the public and sending messages over wireless to Germany apprising them of troop locations and air fields.  Sabotage was part of their plan.  They thought Germany would win the war and they wanted to be ready to accept German rule as a friend to the invaders.

Lucas Hough, a lawyer representing Daniel Knight, seeks Quenby and requests that she meet his employer for a job.  Quenby is not interested until Daniel, alias Dietmar Roth, tells her of his past life.  He is searching for Brigitte, not knowing if she is dead or alive, but to reassure himself that he finds out about her before he passes away.

Little did Quenby know that along with searching for Brigitte, she will uncover information that her investigation into treason among the higher set also includes Brigitte’s past life.  I was SO interested in the chapters dealing with the involvement of so many of British aristocratic members and their savagery.  The years gone by have made searching for Brigitte a definitely difficult task, but I was pulled into the story by the intriguing manipulation of the story line by Ms. Dobson.  What a great read!  My only criticism is that the ending was not as satisfying as I’d hoped.  In fact, I was a little disappointed because I did not think it altogether fit the story…a little too contrived, I think.  However, I would highly recommend this book because my observations may be very different from another reader.

Tyndale House Publishers has provided me with a complimentary copy of this book.

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